Poll: A majority of Jordanians call Zarqawi a ‘terrorist’

This is a follow-up to my reply to Iraqi blogger Zeyad, who felt that the majority of Jordanians regard the late Zarqawi a martyr.

The death of al-Qaida’s chief in Iraq, Abu Musab al-Zarqawi, is still reverberating in Jordan, where the majority of the population sees him as a terrorist. An opinion poll conducted by the non-governmental organization Epsos Stat Center for daily al-Ghad indicated that 59 percent of Jordanians consider their countryman Zarqawi, whose real name is Ahmed Fadel al-Khalayila, a "terrorist." The poll, which surveyed 1,014 people over 18-years-old from various walks of life, also showed that 67 percent refused to see Zarqawi as a "martyr," as he was dubbed by Jordan’s Islamist movement, sparking an uproar among Jordanians.

…The poll, with a margin of error of 3.2 percent, indicated that 70 percent of the sample saw offering condolences for Zarwqawi’s death as a provocation of national sentiments, especially for the families of the Amman bombings in which 60 people died. Only 15 percent, mostly in the 18 to 39 age bracket, described Zarqawi as a "martyr" or an "ordinary citizen." Source: [UPI]

In addition, here is the article on the poll in Alghad (Arabic) and media-analyst and blogger Abu Aardvark’s take on the survey. Who knows, maybe this poll combined with the recent anti-Zarqawi demonstrations will motivate Zeyad to reconsider his position.

45 thoughts on “Poll: A majority of Jordanians call Zarqawi a ‘terrorist’”

  1. Natasha, I didn’t read Abu Aardvark’s post as saying what you think it does. I think he did a pretty thorough job of trashing that poll. I don’t usually agree with Abu Aardvark, but in this case I do. And I’m not basing my opinion on poll results. I’m basing it on comments I’ve seen Jordanians make on English language blogs over the last year or so.

    BTW, I think Zeyad is a pretty good judge of “man on the street” public opinion. He’s invariably turned out to be right when he’s pointed to shifts in Iraqi public opinion, when everyone else was saying something different.

  2. Pffft…You wanted a poll, and now that you have it, you don’t want buy it. There’s no point in arguing with a pre-determined mind. Thanks for the initiative Natasha (and for the restaurants you recommended a while back:) )

  3. I thought the results of the poll were worrying to me. About 15% still think Zarqawi is a hero and a martyr, and this percentage is toomuch, it can be a dangerous indicator for fundamentalism and justification of terrorism in Jordan

  4. Well…. after I read Zeyad’s post, and what he suggested on Natasha’s blog, I had to test going out and talk to taxi drivers, and guess what was the result…. I swear to God this is what happened… I got into the car and before I tell him where to go he said: Are you Iraqi?? I said:No, why? He replied: cause all Iraqis should be kicked out of this country and to be thrown away….. I said: offfff tab why are you saying this? He told me: they caught the ones responsible for the killing of the Mobile Shop woman in Sahab, and guess what? they were two f=**/-* Iraqis, they did nothing but destroying the country…… you know I am very sad cause Zarqawi was killed, I know he killed 40 50 or even 60 Jordanians, but he used to kill hundreds of Iraqis each day….. (This is the man on street public opinion) Do I really agree with him? what about Jordanian bloggers? what about the majority of the Jordanians, I don’t think any body agrees.
    Every body is welcomed in Jordan: people from Iraq, Palestine, Syria ….. No single Palestinian is allowed to travel to any country unless he travels to Jordan, another case IS Zeyad’s case to get the Visa. God bless Jordan for Helping all our Arab BROTHERS.
    My suggestion to Zeyad again, and all others participated on this issue is to leave Jordan in peace, and to thank God they found a generous country like Jordan.

  5. Hamako,

    There’s no point in arguing with a pre-determined mind.

    Yes, that’s the conclusion I came to about a year ago when I decided there wasn’t much point in reading Jordanian blogs 🙂

    Thanks for the input, but it’s kinda counter-productive to have people telling me that I should ignore what they themselves are telling me, when I read between the lines.

  6. Asfour, how about Libyans?

    The Journey to Amman and back

    I found it telling when Highlander said Libyans had the same “pariah” satus as Iraqis in Jordan. Is that what you call hospitality? And I was personnaly OFFENDED when she pointed out how well Americans are treated in Jordan, because I know damn good and well, from polls and blogs both, that Jordanians despise Americans. Even though Jordanians all speak english with an American accent. There’s some kind of disconnect in Jordan between public opinion and public RELATIONS which is bizarre, and quite alarming.

  7. Why don’t we all put it this way, ok? Away from numbers and which side is over 50%, I think the percentage in Jordan’s population that sympathizes with terrorists like Al Zarqawi is big enough to be worrying and to deserve attention.

  8. Hamzeh, I agree with you. I can’t speak about Jordan in particular, but in general, I think it’s scarey enough that there are some people in this world (no matter what country they are from) who side with Zarqawi and his cause. It’s horrifying to think about.

  9. oh … COME ON….. Don’t tell me you’re judging Jordanian Hospitality using that story…. PLEASE Craig numbers and real case studies can tell, not only one officer in the border.

  10. Craig, first you’re dead wrong about how Jordanians treat Americans, regarding your “I know damn good and well, from polls and blogs both, that Jordanians despise Americans.” I lived in Jordan for years, from before 9/11 through the Iraq war and I can tell you from my personal experience that Americans are treated very well, as is most any expat. It does seem from some comments I’ve heard that feelings about the Iraqi presence are trending downwards. I can’t speak to that personally; during my time in country, this was not the case at all.

    But the large and growing (for obvious reasons) numbers of Iraqis, particularly in the capital, are at the root of this. But this is a universal phenomena and not something localized in Jordan. If you take the social strata of any particular community and, within a short period, begin adding one particular social or ethnic group there’s going to be a backlash.

    The Iraqi presence in Jordan is a longstanding one and one with little ill will in my experience, as Iraqis have contributed not just economically but also culturally to the kingdom. Any change in feeling now would simply be due to the increasing numbers of Iraqis. I know many Iraqis will suggest that Jordanians should be glad they are there, they and all the money they bring. I’m not speaking to that point at all here, as I’m certain there’s a broad range of opinion on this. I’m simply pointing out a simple reality not specific to Jordan: If you take a community of whatever particular social/ethnic mixture and begin adding large numbers of one particular group its eventually going to create some tension. You’ll find this from China to the USA.

    The bottom line is that the Jordanian treatment of Americans is really above reproach. It is a real challenge to name a country that treats visitors as well as they are treated in Jordan. Iraqis may be feeling some xenophobia as of late, but I think that will change as the numbers stabilize. History has shown it to be the case.

    The second thing Craig: Where on earth did you learn that “Jordanians speak with an American accent”? Jordanians learn English via a British system. Most, if not all, speak English with a British accent more than any other. Some would suggest they have an accent all their own. Grammar and spelling for most all English publications works on a British system. It’s truly rare to meet a Jordanian speaking with an “American” accent. I know many Jordanians and know of only one that meets such a standard. I’m not sure where you got that information but it too is dead wrong.

    And what of it anyway? So what! You say that, were your supposition correct, it suggests a “disconnect”? Are you serious?

    Lastly, you note that you are gathering knowledge based upon “polls and blogs.” I’d suggest you seek other sources as well. Polls, as evidenced here, are easily manipulated either by changing the sample group, the methodology or by spinning the results. There was great concern about the accuracy on this blog of a web poll, with some suggesting that “Aljazeera is more accurate,” etc. That’s a pant load of crap as well, I’m afraid.

    Every online poll out there can be manipulated if people want to manipulate it. Is the poll based on IP? Then people will spoof IPs or use multiple computers. Base it on email and people will create new identities. If someone or some group is motivated enough, they can skew anything. But that sidelines the broader issue of “who” is being polled. If a web-based poll is put on a site that caters largely to one specific viewpoint, then you can bet the polls will skew in that direction – that is unless someone from outside that group has knowledge of the poll and enjoins his compatriots to try and skew it another direction; something we’ve witnessed here.

    And then when all is said and done and the numbers are out there, people start spinning the numbers one way or the other, depending on what they want to get out of them. This speaks to Hamako’s point about how a poll really won’t change the mind of someone fixated to their position; they’ll find an angle that supports their position, much as a horoscope somehow conveys the day’s events to its believers. But in reality, polls do not create hard and fast rules about anything. They are a sampling and I think nearly always flawed; although many polling firms will surely take issue with this. They suggest trends but with a myriad of caveats.

    Bottom-lining it here: It’s foolish to consider yourself an expert on anything based upon polls and worse… blogs. To step out with opinions that you consider as sacrosanct as fact about a particular race, country or people based upon things in blogs and polling of any type is to sell yourself and that particular group terribly short. Get outside; try personal face-to-face feet-on-the-ground experience. It’s a far better gauge.

  11. Jeff, I have to disagree with what you said about which English accent Jordanians lean more towrds. I believe Jordnaians (and almost everyone in this world) lean more towards an American accent than the British one even if their English textbooks are British.

    That is of course not to say that most Jordanians really speak with a heavy and bad English accent to the point that it really can’t be called either American or British.

    My English accent is definitely not British, as a matter of fact most Americans think I grew up here in the US and I was told that on my first day in the US.

    Think hollywood movies, rock music, video games, that kind of stuff :p

  12. Natasha, I don’t wish to turn this into a challenge, and I would be more than glad to be proven wrong on this issue. But it seems many of the Jordanian bloggers took my comment as an offense. It was just a casual comment on my experience with the Jordanians I met during my stay. I did not mean it to be an accurate indicator of Jordanian public opinion. Just note how many of your commentors are saying ‘Zeyad should be grateful because Jordan did so and so for Iraqis,’ or crap like that. No, I don’t think I should be grateful or thankful for anything. I didn’t come here to stay, nor would I want to. I’m here on a legitimate visit and I have a visa application to finish, then I’m out of here. That’s not a favour. Countries are not tribal sheikhs.

    Also note that no one has answered my request to meet and survey the opinions of Jordanians on the street. One blogger did offer to meet a few days ago but has since not responded to my emails.

    A few people here have tried to discourage me from carrying out the experiment because they feel that I’m asking for a free visit to the Jordanian Mukhabarat. I don’t want to get into any trouble while I’m here either.

  13. Dear Zeyad,
    Please do not be offended by my post. I really did not mean harm. I was just continuing the discussion:) I see your point, and I understand your position. I’m just trying to provide the other side of the story.

    I apologize for any offensive comments on this blog. It seems that the Jordanian Vs Iraqi issue is more controversial than that I thought. I had no idea. I will arrange a meeting with you and the Jordanian bloggers. I promise. I wish I was in Jordan to meet with you personally. Meanwhile, enjoy your stay in Amman.

  14. Jordanians Dont like Americans?

    Hahahahaha. I swear when my parents when to Jordan this summer, people would treat them normal when they were speaking in Arabic. But then, when my parents would speak English and say they were visiting from America, the red carpet would be pulled out for them. Guys were even asking my dad to pack them in his suitcase so they can go to America.

    I dont think that shows hate for America. Lets get one thing straight. Many people all over the world love America, but hate its politics. Even Americans hate American Politics.

    All the people bashing Jordan should just check themselves out first.

    Alarming numbers? who cares. Less than 50% of the population in Jordan are actual JORDANIANS. Now, lets try to examin every other freaking Arab country out there, and I think Jordan would be the least of our worries.

  15. Hi Jeff,

    Bottom-lining it here: It’s foolish to consider yourself an expert on anything based upon polls and worse… blogs.

    I never claimed to be an expert on Jordan, for one thing. I’ve never been to Jordan, and I’ve never met a Jordanian. I think you misunderstand my comment, though. I resented the fact that Americans recieve preferential treatment in Jordan. That’s not going to make things any better, in Jordanian public opinion.

    As far as polls and blogs… well, Jeff, what do you want me to do? Get my opinions from the news? That’s what I sued to do, and all I ever heard was what a great ally of the United States Jordan was, and much “with us” Jordanians were in the war on terror. And then I read some Jordanian blogs and found out that was pretty far from the truth. So now you seem to be telling me that these bloggers (and blog commenters) are wrong, the polls are wrong, Zeyad is wrong… and the news stories I saw a few years ago were right?

    Sorry, Jeff. I’m going to go with the polls and the blogs. People tend to state their true opinions, when they can do so anonymously. I’ll probably never be in Jordan, so this is the closest to the truth I’m going to be able to get. But no, I don’t think I’m an “expert” – I’m just a human being trying to make sense out of the level of hostilty towards the US that seems to be coming out of the middle east. I don’t think it’s particularly helpful to pretend it doesn’t exist, or that it didn’t (in fact) exist prior to September 11th 2001.

  16. Linda,

    Now, lets try to examin every other freaking Arab country out there, and I think Jordan would be the least of our worries.

    Have you even read the polls of “every other arab country?”

    If so, how can you claim that Jordan is the least of our problems? Jordan is the only country in the middle east where terrorists are gaining ground, in public opinion. And public support.

    And as I said in my comment to Jeffrey, I don’t think the “red carpet” treatment for Americans makes things any better. The Jordanian border guard highlander mentioned in her travelogue referred to orders coming down from their “American Masters” – that’s a problem. That’s a resentment against America. Think it’s isolated?

  17. “Alarming numbers? who cares. Less than 50% of the population in Jordan are actual JORDANIANS.”

    Who cares? uh… I do! What’s the point of admitting that the numbers are alarming if you’re gonna say “who cares?”, unless you want to tell us that you simply don’t care at all about what happens in this country?

    Regarding the second part of that sentence, I think it’s inaccurate. I’m really not sure what you meant by it, but I’m guessing that you’re talking about the fact that most Jordanians come from families that settled in Jordan after the country’s establishment (mostly from Palestine).

    That’s irrelevant! We’re living in the 21st century for God’s sake, 85 years after the country was established. The term “Jordanian” (and that includes “actual JORDANIAN”) no longer means people whose grandparents were born in Jordan. Today, you are Jordanian if you hold the Jordanian citizenship and fall under the Jordanian law and enjoy the services that other Jordanians enjoy, and have the same responsibilities towards your country that they have too. And I don’t see how this is relevant.

  18. “If so, how can you claim that Jordan is the least of our problems? Jordan is the only country in the middle east where terrorists are gaining ground, in public opinion. And public support.”

    If you think Jordan is the only country where this is happening then you are very much mistaken, the fact is, since the unprovoked American occupation of Iraq you will find levels of polarisation in society and resentment towards American policies in the Middle East increasing almost everywhere, how else could it be when a place like Jordan is surrounded by two bloody occupations, a country that was being threatened by war or sanctions to the North, and a rich southern neighbour which for ages had been bankrolling the spread of Wahhabi thought? The fact is, most people in the Middle East know that they are being forced against their will to do things for the American government, an example of this would be the Jordanian border guard in the story in the link you provided.

    You want to know about the hostility people in the Middle East have towards America (politically I mean, on a personal level its nothing like that) then come over and see for yourself because blogs and cnn wont tell you anything useful.

  19. “You want to know about hostility people in the Middle East have towards America, (politcally I mean, on a personal level it’s nothing like that) then come on over and see for yourself……”

    LOL, Well, that sentence really makes me want to go the Middle East now. Can’t wait to experience all that hostility.

    Just kidding. Sort of. I think you’re right, we as Americans need to go there to really get a feel for what and how people there view us.

    But blogs are helpful and the closest thing to being there for those of us who can’t travel.

  20. Onzlo, thanks for making my point for me… I think 🙂

    I stand by the statement that Jordan is the only country where support for terrorism is increasing, though. It’s in the polls, and it’s on the blogs too, for people who look.

  21. Onzlo, one more thing:

    politically I mean, on a personal level its nothing like that

    It may be political to you. It’s personal to us. Terrorists kill the innocent for political gain. That political hate is what drives them. It is VERY personal, whether it looks that way to YOU or not is unimportant to me.

  22. I am so glad that Craig does not represent the majority of Americans and only a small close minded extremist minority

  23. “Less than 50% of the population in Jordan are actual JORDANIANS”

    Linda, what the hell is that supposed to mean?????

  24. Zeyad

    3omar binil khattab said it best I guess when he said:

    “Ya sha3ba il 3iraq, ya ahla al kathibi wal nifaq”

  25. I am glad about the results of this poll. I am not sure how right or wrong those results are, but it is good to see some indication that shows that most of the Jordanians are against AL Zarqawi.

    To tell you the truth, the Iraqi guy has some validity in his opinion. I have some Iraqi friends, and they do have experienced same things with some Jordanians especially those taxi drivers. It is the opinion of those guys that stick in the head of the Iraqi’s because they dont believe that such people who think in this way exists.

    Sure there are people who are affected by the idea of being against USA no matter who is against it, but we also have (as in the poll) the majority of jordanians against Al Zarqawi and what he represents.

  26. I personally have no feelings towards the death of Zarqawi. People die in war everyday, he is just another case. I also don’t believe he is a war hero; however, I am not happy that the US army is celebrating his death.

    “It’s personal to us. Terrorists kill the innocent for political gain ”

    Craig,

    I guess you mean the US army, right!!

    Try to be reasonable Craig. Give me one reason why I should like or respect the US politics and the people who support this politics.

    I believe people like you are the reason why everyone in Middle East will end up hating USA and its citizens.

  27. I love it. You see, Jeff? 🙂

    Got the 50% support for terrorism right here on Natasha’s blog, though they don’t frame it that way. And the 80% who dislike America too.

  28. Craig, please do your best to read and consider the entirety of a comment before you reply and then zip about making little wisecracks. Please note that my previous comment said, “Lastly, you note that you are gathering knowledge based upon “polls and blogs.” I’d suggest you seek other sources as well.” I did not discount that information could be gleaned from blogs and polls, only that it should be tempered with information from other sources as well; it’s right there in the “seek other sources as well” part. And although mine was quite the treatise, you seemed to have skipped this final paragraph that reiterates the same point:

    To step out with opinions that you consider as sacrosanct as fact about a particular race, country or people based upon things in blogs and polling of any type is to sell yourself and that particular group terribly short. Get outside; try personal face-to-face feet-on-the-ground experience. It’s a far better gauge.

    You denied it but you do feel you’ve gained some degree of expertise on Arabs and the Arab world from your experiences interacting and reading blogs. It’s great that you are “reaching out” to the “other” there Craig, regardless of your motivation. But it’s not sufficient I’m afraid, to obtain a full accurate picture. It’s the beginning of an education and a great one if you have cajones to pursue it. But you’ve only made it through elementary school I’m afraid. You also need to engage people beyond the cyber wall if you really want to gain some understanding. And yes, a visit to the Middle East, Jordan more specifically, might really do you well. I’m sure you’d find many amongst the American haters residing there that would be glad to host you. That’s really all I have to say to you on the matter.

  29. Hi Jeff,

    Well, since you brought up a paragraph in particular and asked me to address it, I suppose I will.

    To step out with opinions that you consider as sacrosanct as fact about a particular race, country or people based upon things in blogs and polling of any type is to sell yourself and that particular group terribly short.

    I don’t have any opinions that I consider “sacrosanct”, Jeff. I just have personal opinions, the same as everyone else.

    Get outside; try personal face-to-face feet-on-the-ground experience. It’s a far better gauge.

    Yes. You’re right. I travelled all over southeast asia when I was in the Marines back in the 80s, and that’s when I first became aware that things weren’t the way they were reported in the American media. However, I have no intention of going to Jordan. I’m not in the military any more, and I really don’t like to go places where I’m not wanted.

    The last time I was in the Middle East was in 1983. I don’t intend to ever go back, unless I have a very good reason to do so.

    It’s great that you are “reaching out” to the “other” there Craig, regardless of your motivation.

    I don’t know what you think you know about me, Jeff, but I work with Arabs and Iranians, and I have done so for the last 15 years. My best friend is an Arab muslim woman, and I know her better than I ever knew my ex-wife. Who is Chinese, by the way. I may not be an expert (I don’t recall saying I was) but I’m not an idiot either, Jeff. When I see Jordanians saying teh kinds of things they say on blogs (and in polls) I believe it. There’s soemthing WRONG in Jordan, Jeff. It’s trending in teh opposite direction form the rest of the countries in the ME. You can pretend it’s not teher if yuou like, but you can read the evidence right here in Natasha’s blog, from Jordanian readers.

  30. “It’s great that you are “reaching out” to the “other” there Craig, regardless of your motivation”

    I love this last bit that Jeff said to Craig, regadless of your motivations. Craig, finally people are starting to see that you have some sort of motivation, what is it? Are you courages enough to tell us?

    3ogla

  31. “When I see Jordanians saying teh kinds of things they say on blogs (and in polls) I believe it.”

    Actually Mr. Craig, you choose what you want to read and see, 99% of the Jordanians and Arabs on Natasha’s blog were praising the killing of Zarqawi. There were one or two that said they are against killing period, however, they don’t regret that Zarqawi is gone, so maybe you need to learn how to read.

    “but I’m not an idiot either”

    I was gonna say I beg to differ and say that you are an idiot, but my appologies, true you are not an idiot, you are purly evil, hateful person Craig, you are truly hateful

    Bil 3adal

  32. You see, Jeff? You think I’m supposed to ignore what these people tell me, and listen to you, instead?

    I started reading Natasha’s blog about a year ago for a brief time, and then I stopped. These hatemongers are blaming their hate on me (I deserve it, apparrently) but they were saying the same things last year, to other people. It’s always someone’s fault, isn’t it?

  33. When poeple side with Zarqawi they are not doing it because they like terror and terrorists, it’s simply because they don’t belive the sources of the charges (US and govt of Jordan) who were locked in a deadly battle with his group. Zarqawi wanted to topple the govt and kick the americans out of iraq. not surprisingly, the other side will do its best to destory him in the media and physically. again, it’s all a question of crediblity of sources. but if you ask the same people who think Zarqawi is a good guy whther they approve of targetting innocents, I will wager that over 99% of respondants will say NO, including those who consider Zarqawi a hero. at the end of the day, the killings did not end in Iraq, which proves all along that he is not a key figuer. but when the US needs victories, they will inflate a threat then take it out. love zarqawi or hate zarqwi, the question boils down to: which sources of info do you think is credible. i for one don’t buy any info from official Arab media (including ones funded by shieks and princes) or US media. we have seen how they turned palestinains into terrosist and collateral damage and the israelis, the invaders and the ethnic cleansers, are the eternal victims. there is a serious credibilty crisis in the US media, which is overwhelmingly ideological, with few notable exceptions such as the christian science monitor and a handful of others.

  34. “Onzlo, thanks for making my point for me… I think 🙂

    I stand by the statement that Jordan is the only country where support for terrorism is increasing, though. It’s in the polls, and it’s on the blogs too, for people who look. ”

    Im sorry but what is your point? I dont see a point to what you say, only absurd blanket statements based on some weird need to feel hated!

    As for your second statement, then it is completely unscientific, the fact that these polls are taken in Jordan and not in all the other countries of the Middle East will obviously give you skewed results, also what polls are you talking about? And where does it say that support for terrorism is increasing?

    As for blogs, a quick keyword search on Jordanplanet gave me the following results:

    http://www.black-iris.com/?p=831
    http://ajloun.blogspot.com/2006/06/zarqawi-dead.html
    http://fatshino.blogspot.com/2006/06/so-z-guy-has-been-tossed-into-historys.html
    http://myoccupation.blogspot.com/2006/06/what-to-make-of-zarqawis-death.html
    http://jadmadi.net/2006/06/08/a-good-reason-to-celebrate/

    etc….

    So what the hell are you talking about?

  35. So what the hell are you talking about?

    Talking about you, Onzlo… and about 50% of the other inhabitants of Jordanian blogs. Not the bloggers themselves. You dispute what polls show, while at the same time, you yourself prove their validity with your own commentary. Isn’t it obvious by now, that’s what I’m talking about?

  36. I’ve seen 2 questions for you here so far Craig, can you answer them for us or you choose to see what you want again?

    1) What is your motivation behind all this?

    2) How did Eltahaway calm you after 9/11?

  37. “Yes, that’s the conclusion I came to about a year ago when I decided there wasn’t much point in reading Jordanian blogs :)”

    So Craig why don’t you stop reading Jordanian blogs then, its been a year and your still here.

    “Thanks for the input, but it’s kinda counter-productive to have people telling me that I should ignore what they themselves are telling me, when I read between the lines.”

    How about you stop reading between the lines and read the lines themselves Craig

    You are one sick person

  38. So Craig why don’t you stop reading Jordanian blogs then, its been a year and your still here.

    I was here because of Zeyad. Now I’m gone. Have a nice life 🙂

  39. Last comment on this blog from me, 3ogla. So here goes:

    1) What is your motivation behind all this?

    a) to point out that Zeyad’s obesrvations were probably right. You were quite helpful to me in that regard 🙂

    b) to point out to whatever Jordanians read this blog that not everyone is naive enough to believe their two-faced bullshit claims and dishonest parsing of words. I, for one, hear what people like you are REALLY saying, 3ogla, and you aren’t alone. Jordanian blogs are filled with hypocrits who endeaver to hide the truth of their opinions. That’s why I chose a year ago not to READ any Jordanian blogs. It seems to be a uniquely Jordanian issue. Tell the fucking truth, why don’t you? Whatever the truth may be.

    2) How did Eltahaway calm you after 9/11?

    That’s none of your damned business. I’m not going to give somebody like you even more reasons to despise Mona, or to despise me. Adn wahtever I said, it would be just cause for you to scorn the both of us, wouldn’t it? Why? Because you’re JUST LIKE all those other Arab commentators who were blaming the 9/11 atatcks on America, in teh American media. Aren’t you? Next time you ask why the war on terror is happening, and why so many people are suffering, look in the mirror. The answer is YOU.

  40. imhawish

    3omar binil khattab said it best I guess when he said:

    “Ya sha3ba il 3iraq, ya ahla al kathibi wal nifaq”

    When you decide to quote at least do it right.
    It was not Omar ben el Khatab who said that, it was Al Hajaj Ben Yousef el Thaqafy and what he said was ” Ya ahla el iraq, ya ahla el shiqaq wa el nifaq”

    Plus i think that was a totally inapropriate comment.

  41. basboos

    So you see my comment as inappropriate, however, all of Zeyad’s comments condeming the whole country of Jordan while he benefits from its stablity and safety and while its the only country in the world to give him a chance for a better life wether he chooses to stay in Jordan or go through JORDAN to another country as appropriate? How hypocratical.

    Also I’m shocked that you think that my comment was not in its place while you’ve seen all what Craig has said and you ddin’t say anything about that? Maybe you agree with him, who knows?

    So I don’t need you to tell me what is right and what is not right to say.

    Thank you

  42. “Last comment on this blog from me”

    Yeah I thought you said that a year ago.

    “to point out that Zeyad’s obesrvations were probably right”

    I’m glad you used the word probably, I’m amazed that you fight with all you’ve got when you think you are PROBABLY right, and Iraq PROBABLY had WMDs, well guess what it was wrong Iraq didn’t have WMDs. So you are probably wrong.

    “for one, hear what people like you are REALLY saying”

    Really now?

    “That’s why I chose a year ago not to READ any Jordanian blogs”

    Once again you mention that you chose a year ago, yet as I followed this blog and other Jordanian blogs, I’ve seen your verbal violence and hatered spread throughout the blogs, so apparently you can’t stick by your decitions.

    “Tell the fucking truth, why don’t you? Whatever the truth may be.”

    I like this one, whatever the truth may be. Well you remind me of an episode of Sienfeld, when Jerry wanted to lie and he couldn’t until George told him, “If you believe it, its not a lie”. Unfortunatly the truth to you is a bunch of lies that you’ve come to beleive through your imaginary pathetic life.

    “That’s none of your damned business. I’m not going to give somebody like you even more reasons to despise Mona, or to despise me.”

    I don’t despise Mona, I do think that she aims to please the people in charge of the main media to gain popularity and reach higher postions. You yes I despise, because you are a sick f***.

    “Because you’re JUST LIKE all those other Arab commentators who were blaming the 9/11 atatcks on America, in teh American media”

    Now you are comdeming all Arabs not just Jordanians, however, in your previous comments you said that Jordan was going backwards in their veiws, while other Arab countries were moving ahead. Wow, changing your mind aren’t you?

    “Next time you ask why the war on terror is happening, and why so many people are suffering, look in the mirror. The answer is YOU.”

    Unfortunatly you are right, peace makers are over shadowed by people that want war and violence, the more we preach peace the more they hate us and go towards war. However its ok, because “Blessed are the peace makers for theirs is the kingdom of heaven”

    This is a general comment for other Americans that read this blog.

    From what I saw, Jeff was the only American to stand against what this sick Craig said, so thanks for that. However, the rest of you while I’m sure that you don’t share Craig’s twisted views, I haven’t seen you stand up and say wait a minute “WE Americans” are loving people and put him in his place. I do believe that 99% of Americans are good people but we need to hear the good people not only the bad ones. Same goes for the Arabs, I know that 99% of Arabs are good people but the good people are not speaking up as much as they should.

    Craig, I’m sure you’ll be back to read this even though you might not post. I’ll pray for you and for the good Lord to guide you so that you don’t think everyone is out there to screw you.

    God Bless you brother
    Peace

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